What we're about

Hey literatis, creative/analytical types, makers, doers, thinkers and drinkers -- join our awesome book group! We're a posse new to DC and are looking to meet cool people interested in sharing great literature and non-fiction. Read a book with us. Come with an open mind. Be engaged. Abandon all pretenses. And have fun as we discuss books over spirits and cocktails.

Upcoming events (5+)

Miss Burma by Craig Charmaine (BBL)

Alba Osteria

“Charmaine Craig's Miss Burma is nothing short of stunning. Based on the lives of her mother and grandparents in Burma, Craig deftly tells the epic story of one family as they try to survive the horrors of World War II, independence, and then civil war. What distinguishes this book from others is its frank look at who and what survives under such perilous conditions. Especially for readers unfamiliar with Burma, like me, Miss Burma is a chronicle of loss and love in a country too long neglected by the world.” — Michael Triebwasser, Politics & Prose Books and Coffee Shop We look forward to reading, learning, and discussing this book with all of you! Miss Burma is about 368 pages and can be found on Amazon for $9.60 kindle/$6+ paper. Or, buy local! Search your zip code and support a book store near you: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780802127686 Description A beautiful and poignant story of one family during the most violent and turbulent years of world history, Miss Burma is a powerful novel of love and war, colonialism and ethnicity, and the ties of blood. Miss Burma tells the story of modern-day Burma through the eyes of Benny and Khin, husband and wife, and their daughter Louisa. After attending school in Calcutta, Benny settles in Rangoon, then part of the British Empire, and falls in love with Khin, a woman who is part of a long-persecuted ethnic minority group, the Karen. World War II comes to Southeast Asia, and Benny and Khin must go into hiding in the eastern part of the country during the Japanese Occupation, beginning a journey that will lead them to change the country’s history. After the war, the British authorities make a deal with the Burman nationalists, led by Aung San, whose party gains control of the country. When Aung San is assassinated, his successor ignores the pleas for self-government of the Karen people and other ethnic groups, and in doing so sets off what will become the longest-running civil war in recorded history. Benny and Khin’s eldest child, Louisa, has a danger-filled, tempestuous childhood and reaches prominence as Burma’s first beauty queen, soon before the country falls to dictatorship. As Louisa navigates her new-found fame, she is forced to reckon with her family’s past, the West’s ongoing covert dealings in her country, and her own loyalty to the cause of the Karen people. Based on the story of the author’s mother and grandparents, Miss Burma is a captivating portrait of how modern Burma came to be, and of the ordinary people swept up in the struggle for self-determination and freedom. We hope you can join us!

One Part Woman by Perumal Murugan [Translated by Aniruddhan Vasudevan](BBL)

Additional information about the book will be posted at a later date. For now, I'm merely posting the book title so that you may get on waitlists or keep an eye on book sales in advance of the MeetUp. *RSVPs open 30 days before the MeetUp* We hope you can join us!

Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi (BBL)

Alba Osteria

Additional information about the book will be posted at a later date. For now, I'm merely posting the book title so that you may get on waitlists or keep an eye on book sales in advance of the MeetUp. *RSVPs open 30 days before the MeetUp* We hope you can join us!

Red Clocks by Leni Zumas (BBL)

Alba Osteria

For June we will be reading and discussing Red Clocks by Leni Zumas. This timely and terrifying work of speculative fiction is set in a world that the Atlantic describes as “so familiar as to be almost unremarkable.” While it has been compared to The Handmaids Tale (Margaret Atwood) and The Power (Naomi Alderman), Red Clocks does not rely on any natural disaster, mass pandemic, or magical power to create the world its characters inhabit. The Washington Post declares that “[t]he ordinariness of the world Zumas imagines is perhaps the most unsettling aspect” of the novel. In fact, Leni Zumas based some of the laws/details in the novel on actual proposals from lawmakers currently in control of our government. Additionally, the author drew on her own experiences trying to have a child as a single woman and dealing with infertility to write Ro’s story arc. Please join us for what is sure to be a great discussion! *RSVPs open 30 days before the MeetUp* Synopsis: Five women. One question. What is a woman for? In this ferociously imaginative novel, abortion is once again illegal in America, in-vitro fertilization is banned, and the Personhood Amendment grants rights of life, liberty, and property to every embryo. In a small Oregon fishing town, five very different women navigate these new barriers alongside age-old questions surrounding motherhood, identity, and freedom. Ro, a single high-school teacher, is trying to have a baby on her own, while also writing a biography of Eivør, a little-known 19th-century female polar explorer. Susan is a frustrated mother of two, trapped in a crumbling marriage. Mattie is the adopted daughter of doting parents and one of Ro's best students, who finds herself pregnant with nowhere to turn. And Gin is the gifted, forest-dwelling homeopath, or "mender," who brings all their fates together when she's arrested and put on trial in a frenzied modern-day witch hunt Details: 368 pages; available at your local library or online in hardcover and paperback - $11-$16 Find it at a local bookstore here: https://www.indiebound.org/book/9780316434782 PODCAST: Between the Covers – in conversation with Leni Zumas: http://www.davidnaimon.com/2018/01/05/leni-zumas-red-clocks/ Reviews: Washington Post: “‘Red Clocks’ imagines a world where abortion is outlawed. And it feels eerily real.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/red-clocks-imagines-a-world-where-abortion-is-outlawed-and-it-feels-eerily-real/2018/01/16/0575e678-fa5b-11e7-a46b-a3614530bd87_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0ee1710ac018 New York Times: “A Novel That Asks, What if Abortion Were Again Illegal?” https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/22/books/review/red-clocks-leni-zumas.html The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/02/leni-zumas-red-clocks-review/552464/

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