What we're about

Meet other fans of Lesbian Literature here in Seattle. Chat about books while meeting fellow queer ladies who like to read and socialize. You can jump in and join anytime!

Meeting Structure: The meetings are structured to discuss the books and get to know each other. We start with introductions, something we thought about the book (longer than a paragraph, shorter than a page), then we launch into discussion. We discuss the book and the issues discussed in the book for about an hour and a half. Then we end with our names again, last thoughts on the book and any activities/events/announcements people want to share with the group.

You are welcome to attend the meeting if you haven't read the book or haven't finished the book, especially if you're trying to determine if it's the right fit for you. We have on average about 20 women at every book club, often more, sometimes less.

Where we Meet: We meet at Gay City Health in the Calamus Auditorium, 517 East Pike Street. Note, occasionally if there is a conflicting event, we will meet downstairs in another Gay City Meeting room. Enter through Gay City's doors and walk past the library to the doors at end of the path. We occasionally remember to put the book on the door a print out of the cover of the book so you'll know you're in the right place.

After book club: Many of us head over to Elliott Bay Book Store where we pick up the next month's book. We're an official book club with Elliott Bay, so they have enough books in stock for our group and we get a 20% discount. To get the book, simply go to the front counter and tell them you are there to get the Seattle Lesbian Literature Book Club Book. It's often helpful to know the title of the book. (They usually stock our books one or two months in advance.)

After Elliott Bay: Many of us go out for dinner after we pick up the next month's book. Sometimes during the summer it's just ice cream. We decide together where we go for dinner on the spur of the moment.

Occasional changes to meeting space: In the summer, we often head over to Cal Anderson Park and will discuss the book in the sun. Because Seattle weather is unpredictable, we try to post something a day before about the change in meeting space. We also put a note where we had previously said we would meet and one of the organizers typically meets people at the original meeting space and walks over while the other organizer starts the meeting. Other times of the year, we occasionally have a scheduling conflict with the other events that Gay City puts on, we try to make sure people know about this and the alternative space we are meeting.

Parking Advice: Seattle Central Community College has a lot on Pine and Harvard that is $10 all day and evening, so it's cheaper than filling a parking meter.

Picking Books: Julie is always on the lookout for for books that might be good. If you have any suggestions, please email them to her. If we haven't read them, and Elliot Bay can order them for us, they'll go on the next poll. She puts up a poll of four books a few months in advance of a meeting, so members can vote on what we read. An email goes out with descriptions of all the options and the link to vote. If it's a tie between two, we may read them on subsequent months. If there's a strong second place choice, it will probably re-appear on the next poll. The list of books we've already read is here: https://www.meetup.com/lesbianlit-117/pages/1539505/Books_We%27ve_Read/

Upcoming events (4)

December In-Person Book Club - "Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead"

"Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead" by Emily Austin
https://www.elliottbaybook.com/item/rPCoGQ_-yAX5-Zue_1_knA

It's been republished and Elliot Bay has copies now, so we're reading it in December (instead of October as was the original plan).

In this “fun, page-turner of a novel” (Sarah Haywood, New York Timesbestselling author) that’s perfect for fans of Mostly Dead Things and Goodbye, Vitamin, a morbidly anxious young woman stumbles into a job as a receptionist at a Catholic church and soon finds herself obsessed with her predecessor’s mysterious death.

Gilda, a twenty-something, atheist, animal-loving lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired to replace the recently deceased receptionist Grace.

In between trying to memorize the lines to Catholic mass, hiding the fact that she has a new girlfriend, and erecting a dirty dish tower in her crumbling apartment, Gilda strikes up an email correspondence with Grace’s old friend. She can’t bear to ignore the kindly old woman who has been trying to reach her friend through the church inbox, but she also can’t bring herself to break the bad news. Desperate, she begins impersonating Grace via email. But when the police discover suspicious circumstances surrounding Grace’s death, Gilda may have to finally reveal the truth of her mortifying existence.

With a “kindhearted heroine we all need right now” (Courtney Maum, New York Times bestselling author), Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is a crackling and “delightfully weird reminder that we will one day turn to dust and that yes, this is depressing, but it’s also what makes life beautiful” (Jean Kyoung Frazier, author of Pizza Girl).

December On-line Book Club - "Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead"

Link visible for attendees

"Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead" by Emily Austin
https://www.elliottbaybook.com/item/rPCoGQ_-yAX5-Zue_1_knA

In this “fun, page-turner of a novel” (Sarah Haywood, New York Timesbestselling author) that’s perfect for fans of Mostly Dead Things and Goodbye, Vitamin, a morbidly anxious young woman stumbles into a job as a receptionist at a Catholic church and soon finds herself obsessed with her predecessor’s mysterious death.

Gilda, a twenty-something, atheist, animal-loving lesbian, cannot stop ruminating about death. Desperate for relief from her panicky mind and alienated from her repressive family, she responds to a flyer for free therapy at a local Catholic church, and finds herself being greeted by Father Jeff, who assumes she’s there for a job interview. Too embarrassed to correct him, Gilda is abruptly hired to replace the recently deceased receptionist, Grace.

In between trying to memorize the lines to Catholic mass, hiding the fact that she has a new girlfriend, and erecting a dirty dish tower in her crumbling apartment, Gilda strikes up an email correspondence with Grace’s old friend. She can’t bear to ignore the kindly old woman who has been trying to reach her friend through the church inbox, but she also can’t bring herself to break the bad news. Desperate, she begins impersonating Grace via email. But when the police discover suspicious circumstances surrounding Grace’s death, Gilda may have to finally reveal the truth of her mortifying existence.

With a “kindhearted heroine we all need right now” (Courtney Maum, New York Times bestselling author), Everyone in This Room Will Someday Be Dead is a crackling and “delightfully weird reminder that we will one day turn to dust and that yes, this is depressing, but it’s also what makes life beautiful” (Jean Kyoung Frazier, author of Pizza Girl).

January In-Person Book Club - "Girls can Kiss Now"

400 E Pine St

"Girls can Kiss Now" by JillGutowitz
https://www.elliottbaybook.com/item/rPCoGQ_-yAWxVCjha907FA

Named One of the Most Anticipated Books of 2022 by Vogue, BuzzFeed, Bustle, Marie Claire, Harper’s Bazaar, Electric Lit, Thrillist, Glamour, CNN, and Shondaland

“Wickedly funny and heartstoppingly vulnerable…every page twinkles with brilliance.” —Refinery29

Perfect for fans of Samantha Irby and Trick Mirror, a funny, whip-smart collection of personal essays exploring the intersection of queerness, relationships, pop culture, the internet, and identity, introducing one of the most undeniably original new voices today.

Jill Gutowitz’s life—for better and worse—has always been on a collision course with pop culture. There’s the time the FBI showed up at her door because of something she tweeted about Game of Thrones. The pop songs that have been the soundtrack to the worst moments of her life. And of course, the pivotal day when Orange Is the New Black hit the airwaves and broke down the door to Jill’s own sexuality. In these honest examinations of identity, desire, and self-worth, Jill explores perhaps the most monumental cultural shift of our lifetimes: the mainstreaming of lesbian culture. Dusting off her own personal traumas and artifacts of her not-so-distant youth she examines how pop culture acts as a fun house mirror reflecting and refracting our values—always teaching, distracting, disappointing, and revealing us.

Girls Can Kiss Now is a fresh and intoxicating blend of personal stories, sharp observations, and laugh-out-loud humor. This timely collection of essays helps us make sense of our collective pop-culture past even as it points the way toward a joyous, uproarious, near—and very queer—future.

February In-Person Book Club - "Solo Dance"

400 E Pine St

"Solo Dance" by Li Kotomi
https://www.elliottbaybook.com/item/TnfJRnQRH2bUnqjUNN9aVA

A powerful novel about the LGBTQ rights movement and gay love in Japan and Taiwan, from the most important queer voice of East Asia's millennial generation.

Cho Norie, twenty-seven and originally from Taiwan, is working an office job in Tokyo. While her colleagues worry about the economy, life-insurance policies, marriage, and children, she is forced to keep her unconventional life hidden—including her sexuality and the violent attack that prompted her move to Japan. There is also her unusual fascination with death: she knows from personal experience how devastating death can be, but for her it is also creative fuel. Solo Dance depicts the painful coming of age of a gay person in Taiwan and corporate Japan. This striking debut is an intimate and powerful account of a search for hope after trauma.

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