Brian Matheson, Intro to Kubernetes and Chaos Testing @ mabl

Ministry of Testing: Boston
Ministry of Testing: Boston
Public group

Mabl

101 Arch St, Floor 16 · Boston, ma

How to find us

Take Red or Orange lines to Downtown Crossing. You can enter 101 Arch St either from the subway platform (brass doors beyond the entrance to Roche Bros), or across from Macy's and next to Pret A Manger (brass doors). Pay parking is available.

Location image of event venue

Details

The Ministry of Testing - Boston will be holding its February 2020 meeting at mabl's offices, 101 Arch St., 16th floor.

Brian Matheson, Developer Advocate at MayaData http://mayadata.io/ sponsor of ChaosHub and Litmus, two open-source tools that can be used for chaos testing, will be giving an introduction about Kubernetes and how it can be used in testing Cloud Native applications.

Thank you, once again, for http://mabl.com for hosting!

6:00 pm: Meet and greet, enjoying food and beverages sponsored by mabl.

6:30 pm: Session begins

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From the presenter, Brian Matheson:
* Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/briankmatheson/
* Twitter: https://twitter.com/brian_matheson

"The best current practice for new application development is to use Cloud Native design and deployment patterns. There are a lot of reasons for this, but this best practice is driving the adoption of Kubernetes as a standard, Cloud Native deployment platform for hosting microservices in global enterprises now. Kubernetes is young, and stateful applications (i.e. applications that have persistent data storage requirements, whether it's login info, or an inventory database) have been particularly difficult to manage within Kubernetes. In this talk, we'll go over the what and why of Kubernetes (often abbreviated as 'k8s'), The difference between stateless and stateful apps in k8s, and how to test these stateful apps to make sure they're robust.

"Cloud Native apps work best on Kubernetes, but what the heck *is* kubernetes? It's fundamentally an infrastructure abstraction, but it's also a scheduling system that knows how to find "space" for an app in a given set of infrastructure. Kubernetes handles installing and running an application in a container on a specific server, but what about data volumes for that container? What happens to the app if the data goes away, or if the app comes up before the data source is ready?

"Kubernetes comes with a lot of functionality to manipulate the virtual infrastructure around your application. Litmus is a tool that uses that functionality to inject 'chaos' into the infrastructure (think Chaos Monkey). The Chaos test can, for example, terminate one or all instances of a particular service. This chaos experiment can happen any time in the application lifecycle, allowing the user to characterize application behavior in response to infrastructure events".

* MayaData: https://mayadata.io/
* Chaos Engineering Kubernetes with the Litmus Framework: https://www.infoq.com/news/2019/05/litmus-chaos-engineering-kube/
* Litmus: https://github.com/litmuschaos/litmus
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About mabl (https://mabl.com):

mabl is the leading SaaS provider for ML-based test automation.

While development teams have increased their velocity through continuous delivery, the QA tools they use have not kept pace. mabl enables continuous testing with a script-free test automation framework and cutting-edge cloud services allow our customers to run tests without having to manage test infrastructure.

mabl uses proprietary machine learning models to automatically identify application bugs, including visual regressions, javascript errors, broken links, increased page latency, and more. To learn more about mabl, visit http://mabl.com.

Related Links:

* Take the DevTestOps 2020 Survey: https://www.mabl.com/devtestops
* Read Key Findings from the 2019 DevTestOps Landscape Report: https://www.mabl.com/blog/summary-of-the-devtestops-landscape-report