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Novelist Tayari Jones & SF Chronicle’s John McMurtrie on ‘An American Marriage’

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Join us for pizza, refreshments, and an enlightening discussion about Oprah's newest book club pick, ‘An American Marriage’ by Tayari Jones (https://www.scribd.com/audiobook/370846905/An-American-Marriage-A-Novel) — a timely, compelling portrayal of a relationship assaulted by forces beyond the couple’s control.

“A tense and timely love story . . . Packed with brave questions about race and class.” —People Magazine

"Novelist Jones writes brilliantly about expectations and loss and racial injustice, and how love must evolve when our best laid plans go awry."
—Esquire.com

"Tayari Jones provides an essential contemporary portrait of a marriage in this searing novel. ‘An American Marriage’ gorgeously evokes the New South as it explores mass incarceration on a personal level."
—Entertainment Weekly

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SCHEDULE:

12:00-12:30 PM: Doors open — Networking with pizza & refreshments

12:30-1:30 PM: #ScribdChat with novelist Tayari Jones & SF Chronicle’s John McMurtrie

1:30-2:00 PM: Networking and departure

ABOUT TAYARI JONES:
Tayari Jones is the author of the novels Leaving Atlanta, The Untelling, Silver Sparrow, and An American Marriage (Algonquin Books, February 2018). Her writing has appeared in Tin House, The Believer, The New York Times, and Callaloo. Jones is a graduate of Spelman College, University of Iowa, and Arizona State University. An Associate Professor in the MFA program at Rutgers-Newark University, she is spending the[masked] academic year as the Shearing Fellow for Distinguished Writers at the Beverly Rogers, Carol C. Harter Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

ABOUT JOHN McMURTRIE:
John McMurtrie is the book editor of the San Francisco Chronicle. His writing has appeared in the Boston Globe, Washington Post, and International Herald Tribune, where he got his start in journalism more than a quarter-century ago — not including a stint as a paperboy for the Globe.