What we're about

Women Who Go Toronto is a community of women and non-binary Go (Golang) developers committed to learning and sharing intermediate and advanced Go programming topics in an open and inclusive environment.

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Women Who Go Toronto Mascot

Our gopher friend, Meg, is designed by Ellen Hsiang (https://www.instagram.com/ellenpix). The inspiration behind this mascot comes from the well-known photo of software pioneer Margaret Hamilton standing next to her team's tower of code for the Apollo Project. She was a champion of computer programming as a legitimate discipline, and is credited with coining the term software engineering.

Behind Meg is the distinctive Toronto City Hall. In contrast to that other famous but pointier Toronto landmark, City Hall is a curvy harmony of parts. Two towers wrap around the saucer-like council chamber, hinting at standing figures gathering for an intimate chat. It is also the literal meeting place for City Council. Both the building and the meetings are open to the public.

Passionate software engineers, gophers, and a welcoming community? What else but Women Who Go Toronto.

Code of Conduct

All members agree to adhere to the Women Who Go Code of Conduct (https://github.com/gobridge/about-us/blob/master/coc.md).

Upcoming events (3)

Book Club: Concurrency in Go (Part II)

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Go's support for concurrency is one of its outstanding features. Although understanding the concurrency primitives in Go is relatively easy, building more complex things requires some knowledge and practice.

In this event, we'll continue with "Concurrency in Go" by Katherine Cox-Buday. We tackled the first two chapters of this book in our previous Book club. This time we will discuss Chapter 3, Go's Concurrency Building Blocks.

Like past events, we will have an open discussion and share our opinions, personal experiences, likes, and dislikes.

Book Club: Concurrency in Go (Part III)

Link visible for attendees

Go's support for concurrency is one of its outstanding features. Although understanding the concurrency primitives in Go is relatively easy, building more complex things requires some knowledge and practice.

In this event, we'll continue with "Concurrency in Go" by Katherine Cox-Buday. We tackled the first three chapters of this book in our previous Book Clubs. This time we will discuss Chapter 4, Concurrency Patterns in Go.

Like past events, we will have an open discussion and share our opinions, personal experiences, likes, and dislikes.

Book Club: Concurrency in Go (Part IV)

Link visible for attendees

Go's support for concurrency is one of its outstanding features. Although understanding the concurrency primitives in Go is relatively easy, building more complex things requires some knowledge and practice.

In this event, we'll discuss the remaining chapters of "Concurrency in Go" by Katherine Cox-Buday. We tackled the first four chapters of this book in our previous Book Clubs. This time we will discuss Chapter 5 (Concurrency at Scale) and 6 (Goroutines and the Go Runtime).

Like past events, we will have an open discussion and share our opinions, personal experiences, likes, and dislikes.

Past events (25)

Book Club: Concurrency in Go (Part I)

This event has passed