Mini film fest on Florida's natural and urban history

From: Eliza
Sent on: Tuesday, February 23, 2010 9:33 AM
Rollins is screening 3 films (20 minute segments) celebrating the Florida Landscape.?The film on Venice focuses on John Nolen and his influence on the urban planning.
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When: Tuesday, March 2nd at?7pm

Where: Suntrust Auditorium, Crummer School,?Rollins College


The Carr Family Cabin: Celebrating a Forgotten Place in the Florida Scrub" is a short film that tells the story of a Cracker-style cabin retreat built in the late 1930's outside of Umatilla, Florida at the edge of the sprawling Ocala National Forest, The little cabin afforded three generations of Carrs a lasting relationship with an authentic Florida that tourists seldom see, and allowed them to forge an ethic with its land and waters. Archie, Jr. would become one of the state's foremost scientists and writers; Archie, Jr.'s wife, Marjorie Harris Carr, would rally conservationists to oppose the destruction of the venerable Ocklawaha River. Today, restoration of the dilapidated cabin will create an "iconic cultural site" to help visitors become re-acquainted with the vital ethics the Carrs have embodied. Produced by Equinox Documentaries, founded by nature author Bill Belleville and cinematographer Bob Giguere.

Cracker: The Last Cowboys of Florida "[*Cracker*] takes a fun filled journey through the unique and little known lives of Florida's cowboys, featuring ranching, rodeo life, small town existence, and extraordinary footage of the last remaining wilderness. ?Meet horse trainers, a whip master, bulldoggers, barrel racers, conservationists, developers, and a host of unique characters. ?But a crisis looms on the prairie in Florida that is a metaphor for what is happening throughout the industrialized world.... ?*Cracker *documents the work, the play, the families, and the very beliefs in the good earth, of the cowboys of central Florida, and the devastation they face, and that we all must acknowledge"

Venice, Florida, A Past Vision that Moves Forward In 1925, renowned city planner John Nolen designed Venice, Florida, a masterful work of art based on the Renaissance skills Nolen learned at Harvard. ?Nolen designed Venice as a model for what he hoped would become a state of planned cities. Although, this initiative failed, Venice took form, mixing nature and urbanism in sustainable form. ?Nolen and Venice have inspired the New Urbanism, a town planning movement utilizing Renaissance techniques of balance, form, and natural law to offer a sustainable alternative to suburban sprawl. ?This film, presented by Spencer Briggs, and funded by the Florida Humanities Council looks to the past in anticipation of the future.

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