What we're about

The Conscious Breathwork Circle is for anyone interested in self-exploration and transformation through music breathwork journeys in a safe and supportive setting. This type of breathwork is a great way to release and integrate emotions and traumas, to access transformative, nonordinary states of consciousness, and to rejuvenate and relax.

What happens during conscious breath sessions? Participants enter a nonordinary state of consciousness with accelerated connected deep breathing, evocative music, toning, and bodywork. Typical group sessions last 90min. Participants frequently experience physical relaxation, emotional releases, and/or peak spiritual experiences. Conscious breath has similarities to rebirthing, pneuma, holotropic breathwork, and psychedelic therapy.

For the session, please:

- (depending on venue) bring soft mat, blanket, pillow(s), water bottle, journal or sketchpad

- be on time so we end on time

- dress in comfortable clothing

- eat only light food for the previous few hours or fast

- have an open mind and an open heart

Please note that everything shared during the sessions and sharing circle is confidential. No photos are to be taken without participants' consent.

RSVPs: As space is limited, please, if you need to cancel, update your RSVP ASAP (not at the last minute) in case there are is a waitlist. There are often cancellations a few days in advance so do sign up for the waitlist if the meetup is full; waitlisted members are added as spots fill up.

Facebook group for general Bay Area breathwork events: Click here (https://www.facebook.com/groups/bay.area.breathwork/)

Maillist (maximum ~1 email/month): Click here. (http://bit.ly/breath_maillist)

Breathwork references:

Arch, J. J., & Craske, M. G. (2006). Mechanisms of mindfulness: Emotion regulation following a focused breathing induction (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16460668). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 44(12), 1849-1858.

Caldwell, C and Himmat V.K. Breathwork in body psychotherapy: Towards a more unified theory and practice (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17432979.2011.574505). Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy. 6(2), 89-101. 2011

Eyerman, J. Holotropic Breathwork: Models of Mechanisms of Action (https://www.academia.edu/9759923/Holotropic_Breathwork_Models_of_Mechanism_of_Action), Journal of Transpersonal Research, 2014, Vol. 6 (1), 64-72

Eyerman, J., A Clinical Report of Holotropic Breathwork in 11,000 Psychiatric Inpatients in a Community Hospital Setting (http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v23n1/v23n1_p24-27.pdf). MAPS Bulletin Special Edition Vol XXIII, No. 1 Spring 2013

Grof, S. and Grof, C. , with foreward by Kornfield, J. Holotropic Breathwork (http://www.sunypress.edu/p-5092-holotropic-breathwork.aspx), SUNY Press, 2010.

Seppälä, E. M., Nitschke, J. B., Tudorascu, D. L., Hayes, A., Goldstein, M. R., Nguyen, D. T. H., Perlman, D. and Davidson, R. J. (2014), Breathing-Based Meditation Decreases Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms in U.S. Military Veterans: A Randomized Controlled Longitudinal Study (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jts.21936/abstract). Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27: 397–405. doi: 10.1002/jts.21936

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