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Hi! If you're hungry for good literature, you've stumbled across the right page! There are several lists floating around these days of the 100 best books of all time. Some of these books have changed society and the world as we know it (being an American, I'm thinking of The Jungle, or Uncle Tom's Cabin). These lists are varied based on who is determining them and they contain everything from Shakespeare and Charles Dickens to "Bridget Jones Diary" and the Harry Potter series. What's amazing is that the average person has only read about 4 books from any of these given lists. My desire is to find other individuals who are hungry for some good literature accompanied by good friends and maybe some good food and wine, to discuss some of these literary works of art. There are plenty of options to choose from and something sure to fit just about any preference. There's nothing like diving into a good book, but it's even better when you have people to discuss it with.

Interested? Join the group, check out our current selection, and get started reading!

Thanks for visiting!
Rachel

Upcoming events (5)

"No Longer Human" by Osamu Dazai

Online event

* This has been moved to an online event to accommodate participants and adhere to safe social distancing measures. Osamu Dazai lived through multiple suicide attempts before he finally succeeded, and left us with this not so cheery, semi-autobiographical tale. We may not relate to the character or author to the fullest extent, but I think we have all experienced times when we just didn't feel like we fit in. Considered a modern classic in Japan, I'm sure this book will bring out plenty of discussion topics. From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Longer_Human No Longer Human (人間失格, Ningen Shikkaku) is a 1948 Japanese novel by Osamu Dazai. It is considered Dazai's masterpiece and ranks as the second-best selling novel in Japan, behind Natsume Sōseki's Kokoro.[1] The literal translation of the title, discussed by Donald Keene in his preface to the English translation, is "Disqualified From Being Human". (The Italian translation was titled Lo squalificato, The Disqualified.) The novel, narrated in first person, contains several elements which betray an autobiographical basis, such as suicide, a recurring theme in the author's life. Many believe the book to have been his will, as Dazai took his own life shortly after the last part of the book (which had appeared in serial form) was published. No Longer Human is told in the form of notebooks left by one Ōba Yōzō (大庭葉蔵), a troubled man incapable of revealing his true self to others, and who, instead, maintains a facade of hollow jocularity. The work is made up of three chapters, or "memoranda", which chronicle the life of Ōba from his early childhood to his late twenties. New to the Hungry Hundred Book Club? Here's what you need to know: 1. Read the book (If you don't manage to finish it by the meetup date, don't worry. As long as you're not going to be too disappointed by spoilers, you're still welcome to join.) 2. Come to the meeting, usually (but not always!) on the last Sunday of every month. 3. Be prepared to order food/drink at the venue to show our appreciation for letting us use their space. This is a requirement. A lot of time and effort has been put into finding a place that will accommodate our group without an outrageous minimum charge or rental fee, and you'll never be asked to contribute to organiser fees, so please show your respect and support for the restaurant that's letting us use their space. 4. Discuss! It's a casual conversation, so don't be afraid to ask questions and let us know what you think.

"The Death of Artemio Cruz" by Carlos Fuentes

Charlie's Paradiso

I know we seem to be in a string of morose novels lately, but when I was searching for a classic Latin American work this book was often ranked among the best. I couldn't resist. From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Death_of_Artemio_Cruz The Death of Artemio Cruz (Spanish: La muerte de Artemio Cruz, pronounced [aɾˈtemjo ˈkɾus]) is a novel written in 1962 by Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes. It is considered to be a milestone in the Latin American Boom. Artemio Cruz, a corrupt soldier, politician, journalist, tycoon, and lover, lies on his deathbed, recalling the shaping events of his life, from the Mexican Revolution through the development of the Institutional Revolutionary Party. His family crowds around, pressing him to reveal the location of his will; a priest provides extreme unction, angling for a deathbed confession and reconciliation with the Church (while Artemio indulges in obscene thoughts about the birth of Jesus); his private secretary has come with audiotapes of various corrupt dealings, many with gringo diplomats and speculators. Punctuating the sordid record of betrayal is Cruz's awareness of his failing body and his keen attachment to sensual life. Finally his thoughts decay into a drawn-out death. The Death of Artemio Cruz is today "widely regarded as a seminal work of modern Spanish American literature".[1] Like many of his works, the novel used rotating narrators, a technique critic Karen Hardy described as demonstrating "the complexities of a human or national personality".[2] The novel is heavily influenced by Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, and attempts literary parallels to Welles' techniques, including close-up, cross-cutting, deep focus, and flashback.[1] Like Kane, the novel begins with the titular protagonist on his deathbed; the story of Cruz's life is then filled in by flashbacks as the novel moves between past and present. Cruz is a former soldier of the Mexican Revolution who has become wealthy and powerful through "violence, blackmail, bribery, and brutal exploitation of the workers".[3] The novel explores the corrupting effects of power and criticizes the distortion of the revolutionaries' original aims through "class domination, Americanization, financial corruption, and failure of land reform".[4] The Death of Artemio Cruz is dedicated to the sociologist C. Wright Mills, whom Fuentes called "the true voice of North America and great friend in the struggle for the people in Latin America."[5] ... New to the Hungry Hundred Book Club? Here's what you need to know: 1. Read the book (If you don't manage to finish it by the meetup date, don't worry. As long as you're not going to be too disappointed by spoilers, you're still welcome to join.) 2. Come to the meeting, usually (but not always!) on the last Sunday of every month. 3. Be prepared to order food/drink at the venue to show our appreciation for letting us use their space. This is a requirement. A lot of time and effort has been put into finding a place that will accommodate our group without an outrageous minimum charge or rental fee, and you'll never be asked to contribute to organiser fees, so please show your respect and support for the restaurant that's letting us use their space. 4. Discuss! It's a casual conversation, so don't be afraid to ask questions and let us know what you think.

"Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not)" by Jose Rizal

Charlie's Paradiso

You can't go to the Philippines with any curiosity of history and not hear about Rizal. And rightfully so; medical doctor, author and political martyr, he is revered as a national hero and his works are required reading for Filipino students. From The Book Depository: https://www.bookdepository.com/Noli-Me-Tangere-Touch-Me-Not-Jose-Rizal/9781420950342 At the center of "Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not)" by Philippine national hero José Rizal is the conflict against Spanish colonialism. The Philippines, which is named after King Philip II of Spain, was ruled by the Spanish empire as a colony from 1565 until the Philippine Revolution ended this rule in 1898. For his part in the Philippine Revolution, José Rizal was tried and convicted for rebellion, sedition, and conspiracy. His sentence was to be death by firing squad. Juan Crisóstomo Ibarra, the main character of "Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not)," returns to the Phillipines after a seven year absence studying in Europe. He is betrothed to the María Clara, the beautiful daughter of Captain Tiago. With this work Rizal set out to write a novel that would expose the ills of Philippine society and in so doing created a passionate love story set against the backdrop of the political conflict against a repressive regime. "Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not)" and its sequel "El Filibusterismo" are exceptional firsthand documents of the real struggles faced by the Philippine peoples at the end of the 19th century. New to the Hungry Hundred Book Club? Here's what you need to know: 1. Read the book (If you don't manage to finish it by the meetup date, don't worry. As long as you're not going to be too disappointed by spoilers, you're still welcome to join.) 2. Come to the meeting, usually (but not always!) on the last Sunday of every month. 3. Be prepared to order food/drink at the venue to show our appreciation for letting us use their space. This is a requirement. A lot of time and effort has been put into finding a place that will accommodate our group without an outrageous minimum charge or rental fee, and you'll never be asked to contribute to organiser fees, so please show your respect and support for the restaurant that's letting us use their space. 4. Discuss! It's a casual conversation, so don't be afraid to ask questions and let us know what you think.

"Watership Down" by Richard Adams

Charlie's Paradiso

Who wasn't traumatised by cartoon version of Watership Down as a kid? I certainly was. Cute animated bunnies seems innocent enough, but then... Blood, murder, chasing and running down dark alleys... Some still consider this book a "beloved children's classic" but I guess we'll read it as adults and decide for ourselves. From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watership_Down Watership Down is a survival and adventure novel by English author Richard Adams, published by Rex Collings Ltd of London in 1972. Set in southern England, around Hampshire, the story features a small group of rabbits. Although they live in their natural wild environment, with burrows, they are anthropomorphised, possessing their own culture, language, proverbs, poetry, and mythology. Evoking epic themes, the novel follows the rabbits as they escape the destruction of their warren and seek a place to establish a new home (the hill of Watership Down), encountering perils and temptations along the way. Watership Down was Richard Adams' debut novel. It was rejected by several publishers before Collings accepted the manuscript;[4] the published book then won the annual Carnegie Medal (UK), annual Guardian Prize (UK), and other book awards. New to the Hungry Hundred Book Club? Here's what you need to know: 1. Read the book (If you don't manage to finish it by the meetup date, don't worry. As long as you're not going to be too disappointed by spoilers, you're still welcome to join.) 2. Come to the meeting, usually (but not always!) on the last Sunday of every month. 3. Be prepared to order food/drink at the venue to show our appreciation for letting us use their space. This is a requirement. A lot of time and effort has been put into finding a place that will accommodate our group without an outrageous minimum charge or rental fee, and you'll never be asked to contribute to organiser fees, so please show your respect and support for the restaurant that's letting us use their space. 4. Discuss! It's a casual conversation, so don't be afraid to ask questions and let us know what you think.

Past events (159)

"I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings" by Maya Angelou

Online event

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