• Are values distinct from facts?
    Since Hume's complaint that reasoning from facts to values unjustifiably crosses an is-ought gap, we have, most of us, come to avoid the naturalistic and also moralistic fallacies, and to accept uncritically that facts are objective and values are subjective. We dispute facts, but accept values as private and individual. But much has happened since the Scottish Enlightenment, and especially in the last few decades, that calls into question this truism. In "The Collapse of the Fact / Value Dichotomy", Hilary Putnam argues that the is-ought gap is bridgeable after all. We'll read the introductory material and first two essays of this book. https://philpapers.org/rec/PUTTCO

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  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location

  • Seminar II
    For our bi-weekly weekday seminar, we slowly work our way through a number of books, in parallel, each oriented around the interests of one of us. Currently these include books on perception, language, mind, normativity, and modal logic.

    WeWork City Center

    1111 Broadway · Oakland

  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location

  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location

  • Seminar II
    For our bi-weekly weekday seminar, we slowly work our way through a number of books, in parallel, each oriented around the interests of one of us. Currently these include books on perception, language, mind, normativity, and modal logic.

    WeWork City Center

    1111 Broadway · Oakland

  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location

  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location

    3 comments
  • Seminar II
    For our bi-weekly weekday seminar, we slowly work our way through a number of books, in parallel, each oriented around the interests of one of us. Currently these include books on perception, language, mind, normativity, and modal logic.

    WeWork City Center

    1111 Broadway · Oakland

  • Seminar I
    For our weekly Sunday seminar, we typically read a single article, or sometimes a book over the course of several weeks. Beginners are welcome but the material is not elementary, as we are all beginners in this impossible tradition. As Peter Strawson wrote, there is "no shallow end to the philosophical pool".

    Needs a location